Help for future XR18 Owner!!

  1. #1 by Federico Canuti on 04-11-2018
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    Help for future XR18 Owner!!

    Hello to everybody, I知 thinking about buying the XR18 (or the X18 if I get a super deal), and switch my band setup from analog to digital, mainly for ease of setup, our situation is pretty typical (drum bass guitars voice and a few sequence), so we will be using always the same scene, with small adjustments regarding the venue or a few guests.

    I already checked how this mixer works and I think it can do everything we need in a nice package, but I知 here to ask for help, since I can not try it live before I buy (I tried the Line 6 equivalent and was super cool), so please I will be glad if any expert user could tell me if I知 gettin it right or not.

    For live use I will need a complete channel strip for the Singer, so eq-compressor-deesser-(enhancer)-reverb, independent from other channels.
    For drums, eq for all channels and compressor for overhead kick and maybe snare.
    For guitars and bass, eq.
    For main out, limiter and eq.
    Can I do everything with integrated efx in the XR18 without linking external units?

    For Home studio use, I understand it can do as an USB audio interface for windows 10 machines, so I can sell my focusrite Scarlett and Motu 8pre and link the Behringer with Cubase with the same functionality, right?
    I saw a few videos online an it seems that the XR18 has pretty decent preamps with very low noise.

    We are afraid to loose a little bit of quality since now we are using an Allen Heat Zed22fx which is a great analog mixer, but I知 confident that with an integrated digital mixer I can balance things much more precisely.

    Please feel free to comment, you will help me join the community of Behringer users.
  2. #2 by Kevin Kommit on 04-11-2018
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    First off plan on buying a dual band 5ghz router to use with it. The built in routers in most of the digital mixers is not suitable for venues with lots of people carrying cell phones and other wireless devices that compete for bandwidth. Doesn't have to be expensive, you can buy something good enough for around $50 or less on sale.

    Have a backup controller device since tablets and laptops can get finicky. I bring a small tablet and a laptop to each gig along with a 50ft piece of CAT6 cable in case I have trouble with wifi. Since using a dual band router I have not needed it but its cheap insurance and takes up little space in my bag.

    Each channel on the XR has a 5 band PEQ, compression and gates. The Main L,R has a 6 band PEQ or you can select GEQ or TEQ. The 6 Aux buses also give you this option.

    As far as sound quality we don't hear any complaints about that and most of us love the sound and quality of the pre amps most of all. I just run sound for different bands and people are hiring me because I make them sound fantastic with my XR18.

    You don't have a limiter per say on the Main L,R but you just turn the ratio on the compressor to 99 to 1 ratio and it becomes a limiter.

    It has the de esser you can insert on one of your 4 FX busses but you may find you can do what you need with the PEQ on the channel? That would free up an FX bus for something else.

    This is a very powerful mixer packed with features and flexibility so don't get frustrated with the learning curve. Once you get it you will never want to go back. Your initial setups take longer but once you use it a few times and get everything the way you like you can save it and future gig setups are a breeze.

    I save for different venues so when a band plays the venue a second or third time I just recall the saved scene for that band and venue and sound check takes about 30 seconds.
  3. #3 by Federico Canuti on 04-11-2018
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    Thank you very much, what would you suggest as a cheap option for a wired backup control of the mixer? An old laptop or something different?
  4. #4 by Richard YClark on 04-11-2018
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    You can have a play with what the XR18 can do by downloading the Behringer XAir-Edit desktop app for your PC and have a play with that without actually owning the mixer in the Offline mode.
  5. #5 by Ken Mitchell on 04-11-2018
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    - Federico Canuti wrote View Post
    Thank you very much, what would you suggest as a cheap option for a wired backup control of the mixer? An old laptop or something different?
    Hi Federico,

    IMO, I'd avoid "old" laptops since they have a tendency to fail at the most inopportune time. You don't need much CPU power nor do you need gigabit Ethernet to run X-Air Edit so a very low end laptop will be fine.

    If you're in the US, you can pick up some good deals (under $200) here: http://www.tigerdirect.com/applicati...99.99&CatId=17

    Again, If you're in the US, keep an eye on Music Group's eBay factory store for deals with full factory warranty: http://stores.ebay.com/MUSIC-Factory-Store

    Hope this helps,
    Ken

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  6. #6 by Federico Canuti on 04-11-2018
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    Anyone that can comment on the Home Studio part of my question?
  7. #7 by Ken Mitchell on 04-11-2018
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    - Federico Canuti wrote View Post
    Anyone that can comment on the Home Studio part of my question?
    For Home studio use, I understand it can do as an USB audio interface for windows 10 machines, so I can sell my focusrite Scarlett and Motu 8pre and link the Behringer with Cubase with the same functionality, right?
    I saw a few videos online an it seems that the XR18 has pretty decent preamps with very low noise.


    Yes, you can use the X18 or XR18 as an 18x18 USB Audio Interface but not the XR16 nor XR12.

    The XR18 only records at 44.1/48k so both the Scarlett and 8pre have higher samplerates.

    Personally, I'd hold onto them both until you are comfortable with the XAir. For later, you may want to keep the Scarlett for times you feel you need to record at 192k. It also makes a great mobile interface since it is USB port powered.

    I have the XR18 and a Behringer UMC404HD in my studio and I regularly use both. I also use the 404HD as a mobile interface so I don't have to un-cable and re-cable the XR18 when I want something portable.

    Hope this helps,
    Ken


    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    If you want "Loud", then run a piece of sheet metal through a table saw. --Ivan Beaver
  8. #8 by Federico Canuti on 04-12-2018
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    I will probably keep the Scarlett, at leas for a while, it's a nice piece of hw and 4 pres is plenty for many situations.

    I'm having a great deal on the X Air X18 (not rack mounted), as far as I see it's the same that the XR18 besides the form factor and the type of aux , for half the price it's not bad.

    I played with the edit app on my pc and my only fear is the complexity, I was expectin it easier.

    It looks like it will take a while for me to learn, and probably I will be the only one in the band to do it.
    The line 6 for example is more user friendly, but it's less capable and pricier.
  9. #9 by Kevin Kommit on 04-12-2018
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    Posts: 961
    - Federico Canuti wrote View Post
    I will probably keep the Scarlett, at leas for a while, it's a nice piece of hw and 4 pres is plenty for many situations.

    I'm having a great deal on the X Air X18 (not rack mounted), as far as I see it's the same that the XR18 besides the form factor and the type of aux , for half the price it's not bad.

    I played with the edit app on my pc and my only fear is the complexity, I was expectin it easier.

    It looks like it will take a while for me to learn, and probably I will be the only one in the band to do it.
    The line 6 for example is more user friendly, but it's less capable and pricier.
    Line 6 probably doesn't sound anywhere near as good. I've never tried the Line 6. I'm not a fan of their products tone and noise.
    The QSC mixer has some appeal to me. I know nothing about the sound quality of the QSC but it is easier to use and has controls you can run the mixer from instead of having to use a laptop or tablet. Certainly costs much more the the XR.

    If you have an ipad already or plan on buying one I might lean towards the x18 since you can dock the ipad but other than that I'd probably pay a little extra and get the XR since it's a bit more compact and you can find factory refurbs pretty cheap. You could also look at the MR if you have the money?

    If you use an external router it no only gives you reliable wifi but also allows you to have hardwired devices at the same time as wifi by just plugging anything you want into one of the routers ports.

    It's a steep learning curve but well worth it. You will learn more about sound than you ever wanted but the results will be worth it. Better sound means more folks will stick around which leads to better gigs. I've worked with so many bands that seemed to be more worried about what it sounds like to them onstage rather than what the audience hears.
  10. #10 by Ken Mitchell on 04-12-2018
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    Start with X-Air Edit on a Mac or PC

    Hi Federico,

    Based on the way Behringer markets the X18 (with a tablet slot and all) you'd think that was the ideal way to use it. In my opinion, and others might disagree, I found it much easier to learn and also much easier to teach others how to use the XAir mixers with the X-Air Edit app. Maybe it's just an "age thing" for me but I find a 1080p screen easier to learn on vs. a 9.7" tablet screen. In addition, the tablet apps are designed to present as much info as possible in a relatively small screen space so information has a tendency to be layered. Again, this is just my opinion.

    As far as the learning curve goes, start out slow and work your way up to more complex tasks once you understand the basics. I started with and regularly use a tone generator as a tool to explain the signal routing within the mixer. It's also a good tool for understanding the basics of the dynamic controls on the channel strip as well as some of the effects.

    Once you get comfortable with the mixer controls, make yourself a set of rehearsal tracks from your band, send those back to the mixer via USB, and practice making changes to the channel dynamics and adding effects to those tracks.

    Finally, learn how to save a scene (.scn) file from the mixer to your PC. When you have questions about something not working the way you expected, it's good to post the .scn file so we can look at your mixer settings.

    Hope this helps,
    Kdn

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    If you want "Loud", then run a piece of sheet metal through a table saw. --Ivan Beaver